Biography of Madhavacharya

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Biography of Madhavacharya

Madhvacharya was one of the most important philosophers of the Bhakti movement. He was also known as ‘Purnapragya’ and ‘Anandtirtha’. Madhvacharya was the originator of ‘Tattvavaad’, also known as ‘dualism’. Dualism is one of the three fundamental ways of thinking of Vedanta. Madhvacharya is viewed as the third manifestation of Vayu.

He was born in 1238 AD in a village called Pajak near a place called Udupi Shivalli in Dakshina Kannada district. At a young age, he became a good knower of Vedas and Vedangas and took sannyas. He took sannyas in worship, meditation, study and scriptures. He learned from the teacher named Achyutpreksha, a follower of Shankara, and after discussing with the guru, he formed a separate school of his own, which is called “dual philosophy”. According to them Vishnu is the Supreme Soul. Like Ramanuja, he supported the practice of embellishing his organs with the symbols of Shri Vishnu’s arms, conch, chakra, mace and padma. He made his followers in different parts of the country. Established a temple of Krishna in Udupi, which became a place of pilgrimage for all his followers. The social reform of banning animal sacrifice in yagyas is due to them. He died at the age of 79 (AD 1317). The traditional description of the biography and works of Madhvacharya is found in the texts named Sumadhvijay and Manimanjari by Narayan Panditacharya. But these texts are full of exaggerations, miracles and unbelievable incidents because of the author’s devotion to Acharya. Therefore, on the basis of these, no exact details can be presented in relation to the life of Madhvacharya.

He made his followers in different parts of the country. Established a temple of Krishna in Udupi, which became a place of pilgrimage for all his followers. The social reform of banning animal sacrifice in yagyas is due to them. He died at the age of 79. The traditional description of the biography and works of Madhvacharya is found in the texts named Sumadhvijay and Manimanjari by Narayan Panditacharya. But these texts are full of exaggerations, miracles and unbelievable incidents because of the author’s devotion to Acharya. Therefore, on the basis of these, no factual details can be presented in relation to the life of Madhvacharya.

He was one of the most important philosophers of the time of Bhakti movement in India. He is also known as Purnapragya and Anandtirtha. He was the originator of elementalism which is known as dualism. Dualism is one of the three main philosophies of Vedanta. Madhvacharya is viewed as the third manifestation of Vayu.

Madhvacharya was a pioneer of his time from multiple points of view, he has on occasion conflicted with the common traditions. He propounded the dual philosophy. He wrote a commentary on the Brahmasutra of Dvaita philosophy and also wrote an independent treatise ‘Anuvyakyan’ to logically substantiate his Vedanta lectures. Commentaries on the Srimad Bhagavad Gita and the Upanishads, the Mahabharata, the text explaining the meaning of the Mahabharata, the Tatparyanirnaya and the commentary on the Srimad Bhagavata Purana are his other texts. He also wrote a commentary on the first forty hymns of the Rigveda and presented his opinion in several independent episodes.

Main principles of Madhvacharya

According to Madhva, Brahman is sagun and special. Brahma is called Vishnu or Narayan. The Absolute Truth, which is full of all virtues, is the ultimate element. He is also called by the names of Parabrahma, Vishnu, Narayan, Hari, Parameshwar, Ishwar, Vasudeva, Paramatma etc. He is the form of consciousness, but not nirguna, he is the cause of the world. Material is not the cause, Brahma creates the world by his will (maya). The appearance of the living entities and the world is subject to Brahman, so he is considered to be independent, whereas the living entity and the world are unindependent. Vishnu is the doer of creation, regulation of destruction, enveloping knowledge, bondage and salvation. Vishnu, being bodily, is eternal and universally independent. The power of God is Lakshmi. Like God, Lakshmi is eternally free and being a divine deity is Akshara.

According to Madhva, Brahman is imperceptible to mind and speech – this means that just as a mountain cannot be seen completely, in the same way Brahman cannot be fully expressed by speech etc. Sri Madhva refuted the Mayavada of Shankaracharya and said that just as light and darkness cannot coexist, in the same way, it is inconsistent for Satchidananda Brahma to be influenced by avidya, if avidya is true then the Advaita principle is wrong and if avidya is untrue then its How can anything have an effect.

According to Madhvacharya, the soul is different from Brahman, but being a part, it is dependent on the part. Sat, Chit and Ananda also reside in the soul.

Installation of statues

Establishment of idols He had attained many types of yogic siddhis and they also appeared from time to time in his life. He established many idols and the idols revered by him are present even today. In Shree Badrinarayan, Vyas ji also gave him three idols of Shalagram, which he visited at Subrahmanya, Udupi and Madhyatal. When a trader transport was going from Dwarka to Malabar. He drowned near Tulub. It contained a beautiful idol of Lord Krishna covered with Gopichandan. Madhvacharya got the permission of the Lord and took out the idols from the water and installed them in Udupi. Since then he has been in Rajatpeethpur or Udupi madhvamatanuyayi.

Thus became a pilgrimage. Once he saved the sinking ship of a merchant. Impressed by this, he started giving half of his property to them. But their romance was filled with the love of God and the hatred of the world. Why did he start taking her? There are many examples of such unusual renunciation in his life. Many times people tried to harm him and also stole the books written by him. But the Acharya did not get upset or annoyed at all by this, but when he was caught, he forgave him and treated him with great love. He was constantly engaged in the contemplation of God.

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